Have you thought about your conduct

Working in many of the well-known professions within healthcare and wider requires a certain level of conduct. There are expectations for your personal and professional behaviour. Some people consider this is an intrusion of their privacy. But when you sign up to a vocation you sign up to the accompanying lifestyle. Nobody wants to meet their GP in the gutter on a Friday night and then in the consulting room advising on lifestyle on Monday. For osteopaths there are occasions where conduct falls below the expected level. The misconduct may Continue Reading »

Is it time you checked?

Up date your clinic health and safety If you have more than 5 employees there are health and safety requirements and policies you must hold. Most practices will be under this threshold so those are the ones I address here. Even if you are an associate, if you notice something that could be improved you should raise it with your principle. These quick and simple checks will give an overview of your practice health and safety so you can check everything is up to date and take action as appropriate. Continue Reading »

Are you taking care of yourself, osteopath?

Standard D11 states that you must ensure that any problems with your own health do not affect your patients.   It is important that you take care of yourself as a practitioner. Working in practice is not easy, there are a lot of pressures – from people and business pressures. You know them for yourself I don’t need to list them.  Here are five ways you can take care of yourself:  1) Have a holiday. When did you last take a holiday? Do you routinely take breaks from clinic? It Continue Reading »

AHPs promoting Public Health

Following on from my blog last week. There was an important landmark document released this week – the AHP strategy for public health. This is all 4 nations working together. Fifteen AHP professions. All taking a lead in improving public health. The strategy recognises that AHPs are already at the forefront of promoting public health and seeks to emphasise and expand this aspect of their work through initial training, research, evidence, and workplace influence. Although a visionary document it gives an insight into the future influential role AHPs can have Continue Reading »

How do you promote health and well-being in practice?

There are two standards that emphasise the role of osteopaths in promoting health and wellbeing. C6. You must be aware of your wider role as a healthcare professional to contribute to enhancing the health and wellbeing of your patients. A5. You must support patients in caring for themselves to improve and maintain their own health and wellbeing. There are some areas of controversy in relation to public health, not least the arguments surrounding vaccination. I’m not going to address these areas but take a positive approach to considering areas of Continue Reading »

Skills and conundrums in helping people with pain

Using the biopsychosocial understanding for diagnosis and treatment requires an expansion of manual therapy skills. We have already looked in-depth at the explanation of why biomedical reasoning alone is not justified in explaining pain and treatment methods. This post will consider some of the challenges involved in applying biopsychosocial reasoning in clinic. Osteopathic principles? The challenges and changes in clinical reasoning from our understanding of pain and the lack of correlation between tissue state and treatment is also a challenge to osteopathic principles. There has already been questions regarding Still’s Continue Reading »

Grappling with diagnostic reasoning and treatment

Research has established that health practitioners are unable to rely on tissue based diagnoses and justify the effects of manual therapy on mobility or tissue lengthening. There is a realisation that patients need a psychosocial approach alongside biomedical intervention. This has led to the development of several models for diagnostic reasoning and treatment by manual therapists. I’ll just discuss a few models here. It’s a challenge to osteopaths to really think about their diagnostic reasoning and treatment methods in light of current evidence. It’s something all the manual therapy professions Continue Reading »

Reconceptualising an osteopathic approach to pain, Part 1

Research evidence has eroded the foundations of much of osteopathic and manual therapy clinical reasoning: Inaccuracy of palpation Unreliability of postural, tissue-based diagnosis Ineffectiveness of manual therapy techniques to achieve significant changes in posture, tension and mobility. Many postural and structural diagnostic explanations have been found to be invalid, Biopsychosocial? There is an increasing evidence of the importance of the biopsychosocial model. You may consider this to be nothing new. Osteopathic has always emphasised a holistic approach. However, if you were to consider the diagnostic reasoning, treatment methods and treatment Continue Reading »

Patient records – what should they include?

The Osteopathic Practice Standard C2 has a list of what must be included in patient records there are 15 items. I recommend you look through and see if there is anything that you are not routinely including in your notes. This is a list you should return to periodically because it is a prompt for you to maintain the standard of your notes, over time it is easy for things to slip and to get out of routine of including one element. As an example I’ll just highlight a few Continue Reading »

Patient Records: mind your language.

Closely following the requirement for your records to be legible is that the language is understandable. You may find it challenging to consider the abbreviations you use and how well they are understood. You must always be careful what you write in your patient records – I’d like to think that goes without saying. Personal comments about patients, even abbreviated, must be written in a manner that would not cause offence. What abbreviations are you using? Can they be understood? Is your language consistent within your notes? Your notes may Continue Reading »