Listen

The previous blog in this series on communication considered non-verbal communication – the message that your practice conveys through it’s leaflets, website and practice environment. Today we are going to think about listening. Last week I pointed out that the first sentence in the Osteopathic Practice Standards guidance is ‘Poor communication is at the root of most patient complaints’. The first sentence of the standards is ‘You must listen to your patients and respect their, individuality, concerns and preferences.’ Listening is fundamental to good communication and good patient care. The Continue Reading »

Communication – everything but words

Communication is not just about the words that come out of your mouth it’s about the whole patient journey from their first contact with your patient to your last. We have previously considered consent and complaints and I have stated several times how communication is key to good consent and complaints processes. The OPS begins with communication as this forms the basis for demonstrating good practice standards. You communicate your standards through every aspect of your practice – the information on your website, your branding, your advertisements, social media, your Continue Reading »

Shaping your future – learning from feedback

Last week we looked at lessons you can learn from fitness to practice proceedings. This week we are going to think about learning from feedback received in clinic.  It’s really important to use positive and negative feedback for your personal development. If you simply ignore feedback and try to hide away from it you will find that it can have a negative impact on your professional development. Duty of Candour In this series on complaints it is appropriate to just remind you of the Duty of Candour – D3 of Continue Reading »

Lessons from complaints investigations

There is a lot that we can learn from complaints and concerns that go to the GOsC. We’re going to look at some of the lessons we can learn today and next week we’ll look at professional development from issues arising within clinic. The GOsC 2017-18 fitness to practice report has recently been published which gives details of how investigative processes work and cases from the last year. I’m using this report as the basis for this article. How are complaints investigated There are three committees that handle complaints at Continue Reading »

Recognising the sparks – handling complaints

Have you heard the saying: From a little spark a great fire can be kindled. I’m going to use sparks as a metaphor for feedback. You can recognise those sparks of feedback and deal with them in different ways. You don’t know where that spark might lead but you can direct it’s course by taking appropriate action. We’re going to look at different types of sparks, recognising the sparks – both positive and negative and then handling sparks and conclude with a few warnings. Where is your spark leading? Often Continue Reading »

Your complaints procedure – it’s essential

This month we are going to be covering the subject of handling complaints. In my opinion handling complaints is one of the key components of good practice alongside good consent procedures and good communication. A complaints policy is compulsory We will consider your complaints procedure, handling complaints, learning from complaints and using feedback for professional development. We will also consider the Duty of Candour. These subjects relate to standards D3 and D4 in Theme D Professionalism. Under standard D4 it is compulsory for osteopaths to have a complaints policy in Continue Reading »

Consent – what you need to know

Here is a free one page summary of consent. You are very welcome to download it and use it to assess your clinical consent. It is a summary of the Theme A requirements of the Osteopathic Practice Standards for clinical consent. The link will download the pdf. Do leave us feedback if you found it helpful or you have suggestions for improvements.

Consent systems and records

Do you have a system for clinical consent? Just as you have a system for taking your case history that enables you to follow a logical pattern, covering all the points you need, I suggest you need a system for clinical consent. The benefits of a system Following a system enables you to make sure that you have covered all the necessary bases. It does not mean that every patient experience is exactly the same. Your consent processes must be individualised to the patient in front of you and their Continue Reading »

Capacity to consent – children and young people

Last week we began looking at the third component of valid consent – capacity. We recognised how capacity involves being able to understand, retain and evaluate information to make and communicate decisions. We particularly considered capacity with regard to adults. This week we are going to consider consent with relation to young people and children and all the three elements of consent – voluntary, informed and capacity. First of all, to define children and young people. In this article a child is under the age of 16 years and young Continue Reading »

The Capacity Conundrum

In the last post we considered 2 essential aspects of valid consent – it must be voluntary and informed and we also looked at how you record consent. The 3rd essential element of valid consent is that the person has capacity to consent, this is the subject fot this post. It is not always a simple decision so you should have a clear understanding of capacity to inform your decision making. What is capacity? Capacity is the ability of a person to understand, retain and evaluate information to make and Continue Reading »