NICE LBP guidelines part 2 – what do they mean for osteopaths?

This is part 2 of discussion of the new NICE guideline on low back pain and sciatica.  Part 1 looked at the content of the guidelines – what you should/shouldn’t be doing. Part 2 considers how the guideline applies to osteopaths. Do we have to follow guidelines? It is probably not a coincidence that an article was published in Manual Therapy in October titled Quiet Dissent: The attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of osteopaths who reject low back pain guidance.  This is an excellent piece of research for providing an insight Continue Reading »

2016 NICE Guidelines Low Back Pain – Part 1

The new NICE guidelines for the management of low back pain have been published.  This article is going to look at what the guidelines say and part 2 will look at how the guideline applies to osteopaths. The guidelines are now much simpler referring to just low back pain with or without sciatica and occasionally chronic or persistent low back pain. Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s First of all rule out any underlying conditions, refer if concerned. Risk stratification is recommended to identify those likely to improve Continue Reading »

Associates – standards of practice are your responsibility

If you work in a practice as an associate you may feel you are protected by being under the umbrella of the practice name and the principal.  Most osteopaths work as self-employed, sole-traders and all are registered with the GOsC as an individual practitioner – therefore you should have in mind that you stand alone.  As discussed in a previous blog, being self-employed has the disadvantage of foregoing the rights and protection associated with employment. So what? The reason I am highlighting this point is that you need to make Continue Reading »

Cervical Arterial Dysfunction – update your skills

Cervical arterial dysfunction (CAD) is the most serious risk associated with osteopathy and any other manual therapy.  There has been much debate over the years about how practitioners should screen for risks – presenting symptoms and provocative testing.  The IJOM contains an excellent article presenting the latest evidence-based assessment knowledge for cervical arterial dysfunction. Practitioners must be aware that it’s not just cervical manipulation that should be considered a risk but all cervical movement can be provocative. This article is a summary of information from the IJOM article.  Please read Continue Reading »

Do you need a fire extinguisher in your practice?

Whilst there is not a specific law relating to whether fire extinguishers are required, there is a responsibility to prove that you have done everything in your power to prevent fire breaking out and fire damage. On that premise responsible practice owners will have at least one fire extinguisher in place.  There are different types of extinguisher depending on the nature of the fire.  You need to consider the fire risks in your premises and purchase the appropriate extinguisher. It should not be more than 30 metres travel in your Continue Reading »

The law on consent changed – what’s new?

The focus of the law on consent changed last year as a result of a landmark legal decision. The change to consent law is consistent with the advice that we have been giving regarding gaining consent with a patient focussed approach, in keeping with the latest research and medical standards.  It is worth understanding the laws relating to consent so that you can be confident that your consent procedures are following the law.  Really this is just the law catching up with what professional standards have been requiring for a Continue Reading »

Striking similarities between mentoring and treating

I’ve been taking a course from the Open University on Mentoring and Supervision. It’s a great course, I’d highly recommend it and it’s free – find it here  (There are some other courses available too.) One of the things that struck me was the similarity between the role of the supervisor/mentor and what we do every day in clinic. The course divided the process of supervision into sections, I will look at them here so you can see how you might enhance your clinical skills through developing your supervision/mentoring skills. Continue Reading »

Promote your registration

Surveys have shown that patients want the reassurance of knowing that their health professional is registered. This gives them assurance that practitioners: Have achieved a standard of training Are monitored by a regulatory body Provide good quality advice and treatment How can patients know their practitioner is registered? Both the HCPC and the GOsC have provided resources to help practitioners promote their registration. The HCPC has produced an infographic that gives some interesting facts about what practitioners perceive as the best ways of promoting registration: 73% Displaying HCPC registration logo Continue Reading »

What do you do when you feel discouraged in practice?

All practitioners experience times when they feel discouraged and there can be multiple causes. Maybe patients are not responding to treatment as expected, perhaps you have had a number of difficult cases, maybe you are bored or lacking enthusiasm. I am sure you can add many other reasons…. A difficult time can be as a new graduate starting out in practice. You have worked extremely hard for four years, passed all your exams, received your degree and you are now a registered practitioner. You are excited about starting your career Continue Reading »

You need to know about this Important New Safeguarding Requirement

From 31st October 2015 it has become a mandatory duty in England and Wales for health and social care professionals and teachers to report any ‘known’ cases of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) to the police. Those registered with the General Osteopathic Council and the Health and Care Professions Council are specifically mentioned in the list of registering bodies in the government document. In this article we will first of all consider the requirement and then risk factors and identification of FGM followed by some useful resources. The Requirement You must Continue Reading »