Posts Categorized: Clinical Compliance

Are you first aid trained? Do you need to be?

In the recent chiropractic court case the coroner recommended that first aid training should be compulsory for chiropractors. You may have wondered whether it is compulsory for osteopaths? Is it compulsory? The standards state that you must comply with health and safety legislation and that you should have appropriate procedures in place in the event of a medical emergency (D5). The health and safety executive provides comprehensive advice on first aid provision available here. http://www.hse.gov.uk/firstaid/legislation.htm There is a lot of flexibility for interpretation. Whether you are self-employed, working from home Continue Reading »

How can we maintain good apples?

The Professional Standards Authority (the Ofsted of healthcare regulators) has commissioned research into professional boundaries and sexual misconduct. It is important to understand the risks in these areas in order to maintain professional standards. GOsC has been working on research into boundaries with the Chiropractic council, recognising this is a high risk area for complaints.   This article will discuss the PSA reports and as the GOsC boundaries work develops we’ll discuss that in a future newsletter. From recent courses I’ve run it has been highlighted that these are important Continue Reading »

Have you done any safeguarding training?

Some people suggest that the patient group that visits private osteopaths are not likely to have any safeguarding issues. I personally don’t think we should judge in this way. Do vulnerable adults or vulnerable children never come to osteopaths? For the last couple of years I have taught a safeguarding children lecture on one of the SCCO modules. At each session there have been stories of practitioners who have had concerns about children. The important thing is to be prepared so that you know what to do should you have Continue Reading »

Patient records – what should they include?

The Osteopathic Practice Standard C2 has a list of what must be included in patient records there are 15 items. I recommend you look through and see if there is anything that you are not routinely including in your notes. This is a list you should return to periodically because it is a prompt for you to maintain the standard of your notes, over time it is easy for things to slip and to get out of routine of including one element. As an example I’ll just highlight a few Continue Reading »

Why patient records matter.

Clinical record keeping is evidence of good professional practice and the delivery of quality healthcare. Every patient that visits your clinic will have a patient record. Have you ever thought about the importance of your patient records? You might just answer – because we have to keep records as one of the standards of being called an osteopath. For all registered health professionals there is a legal requirement to keep patient records but beyond this, what is the reason for making sure your patient records are high quality:  There are Continue Reading »

Capacity to consent – children and young people

Last week we began looking at the third component of valid consent – capacity. We recognised how capacity involves being able to understand, retain and evaluate information to make and communicate decisions. We particularly considered capacity with regard to adults. This week we are going to consider consent with relation to young people and children and all the three elements of consent – voluntary, informed and capacity. First of all, to define children and young people. In this article a child is under the age of 16 years and young Continue Reading »

Consent – it’s not just about risk

In the last blog we spent time understanding the history of consent and the complete switch in the focus of consent since 2015. If you missed it, watch the video on facebook or see the previous post. Consent is the most important aspect of practice In my opinion gaining consent is the most important aspect to osteopathic treatment. It doesn’t matter if you are the most amazing osteopath with incredible premises if you practice without gaining valid consent you are both ethically and legally deficient. Good communication is fundamental to Continue Reading »

Who is Nadine Montgomery and why should you care?

If you have never heard of Nadine Montgomery she is fundamental to the current law on consent. She is not a doctor or a lawyer or a politician she is a patient. This is her story: Nadine’s story Nadine Montgomery was a woman with diabetes who gave birth by vaginal delivery. What is significant about this delivery was that her baby Sam was born with serious disabilities after shoulder dystocia during delivery. The doctor, Dina McLellan did not tell Nadine Montgomery about the 9-10% risk of shoulder dystocia. Why not? Continue Reading »

GDPR Myths and Questions #4 – Explicit Consent

Why we don’t think explicit consent is necessary. There are some sources advising osteopaths that they must get patients to sign that they can give you their health data. At Mint we think that obtaining explicit consent for collecting health data is unnecessary (and so does the Incormation Commissioner’s Office) and here is why: Explicit consent is not appropriate for health data because it is not possible for patients to withdraw consent. If a patient does not consent to their data being processed in the clinic the osteopath is unable Continue Reading »

GDPR Myths and Questions #3 – Consent and Lawful basis

You need to identify the lawful basis you are using for processing someone’s personal data – i.e. your justification for processing that data. There are 6 different lawful bases that you may use, for any given set of data. One of these is consent, but there are others too – e.g. ‘contract’ (valid if someone’s personal data needs to be processed to fulfil your contractual obligations, or because they’ve asked you to do something before entering into a contract, such as provide information). This is completely separate from your consent Continue Reading »