Posts Categorized: Osteopathic Standards Updates

Are you taking care of yourself, osteopath?

Standard D11 states that you must ensure that any problems with your own health do not affect your patients.   It is important that you take care of yourself as a practitioner. Working in practice is not easy, there are a lot of pressures – from people and business pressures. You know them for yourself I don’t need to list them.  Here are five ways you can take care of yourself:  1) Have a holiday. When did you last take a holiday? Do you routinely take breaks from clinic? It Continue Reading »

How do you promote health and well-being in practice?

There are two standards that emphasise the role of osteopaths in promoting health and wellbeing. C6. You must be aware of your wider role as a healthcare professional to contribute to enhancing the health and wellbeing of your patients. A5. You must support patients in caring for themselves to improve and maintain their own health and wellbeing. There are some areas of controversy in relation to public health, not least the arguments surrounding vaccination. I’m not going to address these areas but take a positive approach to considering areas of Continue Reading »

Patient Records: mind your language.

Closely following the requirement for your records to be legible is that the language is understandable. You may find it challenging to consider the abbreviations you use and how well they are understood. You must always be careful what you write in your patient records – I’d like to think that goes without saying. Personal comments about patients, even abbreviated, must be written in a manner that would not cause offence. What abbreviations are you using? Can they be understood? Is your language consistent within your notes? Your notes may Continue Reading »

The Capacity Conundrum

In the last post we considered 2 essential aspects of valid consent – it must be voluntary and informed and we also looked at how you record consent. The 3rd essential element of valid consent is that the person has capacity to consent, this is the subject fot this post. It is not always a simple decision so you should have a clear understanding of capacity to inform your decision making. What is capacity? Capacity is the ability of a person to understand, retain and evaluate information to make and Continue Reading »

Consent – it’s not just about risk

In the last blog we spent time understanding the history of consent and the complete switch in the focus of consent since 2015. If you missed it, watch the video on facebook or see the previous post. Consent is the most important aspect of practice In my opinion gaining consent is the most important aspect to osteopathic treatment. It doesn’t matter if you are the most amazing osteopath with incredible premises if you practice without gaining valid consent you are both ethically and legally deficient. Good communication is fundamental to Continue Reading »

Who is Nadine Montgomery and why should you care?

If you have never heard of Nadine Montgomery she is fundamental to the current law on consent. She is not a doctor or a lawyer or a politician she is a patient. This is her story: Nadine’s story Nadine Montgomery was a woman with diabetes who gave birth by vaginal delivery. What is significant about this delivery was that her baby Sam was born with serious disabilities after shoulder dystocia during delivery. The doctor, Dina McLellan did not tell Nadine Montgomery about the 9-10% risk of shoulder dystocia. Why not? Continue Reading »

The new Mint Folder – What’s changed?

1. The order The folder is now arranged within each of the four themes. The new standards have a much more logical flow so topical standards and guidance are now gathered together under one theme. This means it is no longer necessary to have the Mint Folder arranged by topics. Keeping the order by theme will also help with implementing the new CPD scheme. You will be able to quickly identify where work on a particular area of practice aligns with a theme of the OPS. 2. CPD suggestions There Continue Reading »

What’s changed in the 2018 Osteopathic Practice Standards?

The new Osteopathic Practice Standards have just been issued. They have a 1 year introductory phase before they become the legal standards in September 2019. Mint has studied the standards in detail looking at what’s changed, what’s gone, and what’s new. This article will provide an overview of the changes. The new standards look quite different. There are fewer standards 37 down to 29. They have been moved around and the whole document has been made a lot more logical. Historically there were two documents published separately – the code Continue Reading »

Do you need a fire extinguisher in your practice?

Whilst there is not a specific law relating to whether fire extinguishers are required, there is a responsibility to prove that you have done everything in your power to prevent fire breaking out and fire damage. On that premise responsible practice owners will have at least one fire extinguisher in place.  There are different types of extinguisher depending on the nature of the fire.  You need to consider the fire risks in your premises and purchase the appropriate extinguisher. It should not be more than 30 metres travel in your Continue Reading »

The law on consent changed – what’s new?

The focus of the law on consent changed last year as a result of a landmark legal decision. The change to consent law is consistent with the advice that we have been giving regarding gaining consent with a patient focussed approach, in keeping with the latest research and medical standards.  It is worth understanding the laws relating to consent so that you can be confident that your consent procedures are following the law.  Really this is just the law catching up with what professional standards have been requiring for a Continue Reading »