Posts Tagged: osteopathy

Have you done any safeguarding training?

Some people suggest that the patient group that visits private osteopaths are not likely to have any safeguarding issues. I personally don’t think we should judge in this way. Do vulnerable adults or vulnerable children never come to osteopaths? For the last couple of years I have taught a safeguarding children lecture on one of the SCCO modules. At each session there have been stories of practitioners who have had concerns about children. The important thing is to be prepared so that you know what to do should you have Continue Reading »

Have you thought about your conduct

Working in many of the well-known professions within healthcare and wider requires a certain level of conduct. There are expectations for your personal and professional behaviour. Some people consider this is an intrusion of their privacy. But when you sign up to a vocation you sign up to the accompanying lifestyle. Nobody wants to meet their GP in the gutter on a Friday night and then in the consulting room advising on lifestyle on Monday. For osteopaths there are occasions where conduct falls below the expected level. The misconduct may Continue Reading »

Reconceptualising an osteopathic approach to pain, Part 1

Research evidence has eroded the foundations of much of osteopathic and manual therapy clinical reasoning: Inaccuracy of palpation Unreliability of postural, tissue-based diagnosis Ineffectiveness of manual therapy techniques to achieve significant changes in posture, tension and mobility. Many postural and structural diagnostic explanations have been found to be invalid, Biopsychosocial? There is an increasing evidence of the importance of the biopsychosocial model. You may consider this to be nothing new. Osteopathic has always emphasised a holistic approach. However, if you were to consider the diagnostic reasoning, treatment methods and treatment Continue Reading »

Lessons from complaints investigations

There is a lot that we can learn from complaints and concerns that go to the GOsC. We’re going to look at some of the lessons we can learn today and next week we’ll look at professional development from issues arising within clinic. The GOsC 2017-18 fitness to practice report has recently been published which gives details of how investigative processes work and cases from the last year. I’m using this report as the basis for this article. How are complaints investigated There are three committees that handle complaints at Continue Reading »

Consent – what you need to know

Here is a free one page summary of consent. You are very welcome to download it and use it to assess your clinical consent. It is a summary of the Theme A requirements of the Osteopathic Practice Standards for clinical consent. The link will download the pdf. Do leave us feedback if you found it helpful or you have suggestions for improvements.

Consent – it’s not just about risk

In the last blog we spent time understanding the history of consent and the complete switch in the focus of consent since 2015. If you missed it, watch the video on facebook or see the previous post. Consent is the most important aspect of practice In my opinion gaining consent is the most important aspect to osteopathic treatment. It doesn’t matter if you are the most amazing osteopath with incredible premises if you practice without gaining valid consent you are both ethically and legally deficient. Good communication is fundamental to Continue Reading »

Who is Nadine Montgomery and why should you care?

If you have never heard of Nadine Montgomery she is fundamental to the current law on consent. She is not a doctor or a lawyer or a politician she is a patient. This is her story: Nadine’s story Nadine Montgomery was a woman with diabetes who gave birth by vaginal delivery. What is significant about this delivery was that her baby Sam was born with serious disabilities after shoulder dystocia during delivery. The doctor, Dina McLellan did not tell Nadine Montgomery about the 9-10% risk of shoulder dystocia. Why not? Continue Reading »

Considering Regulatory Reform

The government consultation on Regulatory Reform in Healthcare is open until 23rd January and you are free to have your say: Promoting Professionalism, Reforming Regulation https://consultations.dh.gov.uk/professional-regulation/regulatory-reform/ This consultation is extremely important for healthcare professionals and something you should be keeping a watchful eye on. There are currently 9 healthcare regulators in the UK, and around 1.5 million healthcare professionals. The number of professionals regulated by each regulator varies from a few 1000 to almost 700 000. Each of the regulators has common aims in terms of protecting the public, setting Continue Reading »

The Why? Of Mint

Having encouraged you to reflect on the Why of your practice I have also spent time reflecting on the Why of Mint. There were several logs in the fire that led to the spark that ignited the formation of Mint: The realisation that it can be a lot of work to research and understand the requirements of the Practice Standards particularly in relation to subjects like Safeguarding Children and Health and Safety. The frustration at the unnecessary duplication of effort between every practice taking the time to research and write Continue Reading »

Start with Why?

If you have ever seen Simon Sinek’s inspiring Ted Talk about marketing you will be familiar with the phrase ‘Start with Why’.  He suggests that is the key that makes companies like Apple stand out – look at their marketing it is all about why, not the what and how. Continuing out theme of reflection this month we can ask why? about our practices to help us to focus and reinvigorate our practices. Why? Why did you become an osteopath?  Maybe like so many others you have a story to Continue Reading »